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I SPENT MY  YOUTH IN NORWAY

A NEW CATEGORY

OF REFUGEES

 

emerged in the wake of World War II: Jewish displaced persons, from the Nazi concentration camps or from wartime hiding. It is estimated that there were about 250,000 Jewish displaced persons (DP's) at the war's end.

 

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"I spent my youth in Norway but did not feel “at home” in Norway at that time.

 

A girl my age, who had come with us to the country in 1952 felt the same and decided early to immigrate to Israel following the gymnasium. I had made similar plans as hers, but felt compelled to stay closer to my parents."

After the defeat of Germany in World War II, more than a hundred thousand Jewish survivors of the Holocaust were transported to camps maintained by the allies for displaced persons (DPs).

 

In this new history, historians Angelika Königseder and Juliane Wetzel offer a social and cultural history of the post-WWII displaced persons camps.
 

 

 

 

"I morgen begynner Nansenhjelp-uken. Aldri har noe hjelpearbeid med større rett båret Nansen’s navn.

 

Det er jo hans eget arbeid for å hjelpe de landflyktige som fortsettes."

 

Ragnar Vold, 1938

 

Fritjof Nansen -

les hele artikkelen  her

 

OSLO SAID NO TO EINSTEIN

 

 

3 of 5 voted against offering Einstein a position as a professor in physics at the University of Krisitania (Oslo) in 1920.

 

In 1915, Einstein presented his general theory of relativity. Excerpts of these theories were presented by Einstein during his lectures in the University aula in Oslo, Norway in 1920. The initiative came from the following professors: Harald Schjelderup, Jonas Schanche Jonasen, Ole Colbjørnsen and Lars Vegard. 

It was unusually hot in June 1920. Albert Einstein's three lectures in the University aula in Oslo, Norway, was the first one outside Germany.

It was not only science that brought the physicist to Oslo. The German scientist was also looking to reconcile their homeland with states that had not participated in World War I. The first world war had ravaged and divided Europe.

Einstein was in Norway for 10 days and lectured for an attentive audience in the University's Aula.

FRA NORGE TIL TSJEKKIA 

EN (OMVENDT) OPPDAGELSESFERD

FRA NORGE TIL TSJEKKIA 

"Magne Skjæraasens biografi om Leo Eitinger har forandret mitt liv på den måten at den satte Brno på kartet av norsk historie og litteratur".

av Miluše Juříčková

 

Mange ganger før alt vandret jeg alene i Oslo for å møte Lars Saabye Christensens gutter i Kirkeveien, eller se Hanne Ørstaviks Johanne i Slottsparken, Thorvald Steen personlig oppe på St. Hans Haugen eller Sigrid Undset på Pilestredet.

 

Men med denne norske teksten ble jeg konfrontert med en ny situasjon: å lete etter mennesker som hadde bodd i min egen by, i min egen gate, ja, i nabohuset rundt hjørne, men som jeg ikke hadde hatt noen aning om hvis ikke Magne Skjæraasen hadde skrevet om dem. 

 

En norsk bok som ledet megt i en spesiell retning. Ikke inn i mitt eget indre som skjønnlitteratur pleier å gjøre, nei, denne gangen på en reise i geografi og historie av min egen hjemby som jeg hadde trodd jeg kjente så godt.

 

Les hele artikkelen her

DISPLACED PERSONS IN NORWAY
THE STORY OF MR. M

Class portrait of school children at Schauenstein DP camp, about 1946

It was difficult to be integrated into the Norwegian society that after all was not totally integrated itself into the European mindset. It suffered post-war poverty,

 

it was a Christian nation and quite homogeneous. None of us felt at home. We felt we were foreigners. When I heard or read references to us as ‘you Jews,’ it meant I was still not classified as a Norwegian. It was a difficult time.

 

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WAITING FOR HOPE

Starting with the discovery of death camps by Allied forces, Königseder and Wetzel describe the inadequate preparations made for the survivors. The soldiers were ill equipped to deal with the physical wreckage and mental anguish of their charges, but American rabbis soon arrived to perform invaluable work helping the survivors cope.

 

The historians also devote attention to autonomous Jewish life in and near the camps: theater groups and orchestras prospered, schools were founded, a tuberculosis hospital and clinic for DPs was established, and underground organizations handled illegal immigration to Israel and trained soldiers to fight in Palestine.

Drawing on original documents and the work of other historians, Waiting for Hope sheds light on a largely unknown period in postwar Jewish history and shows that the suffering of the survivors did not end with the war.

FRITJOF NANSEN 1938

Nansen pass. Utstedt av Folkeforbundet. Den juridiske etterfølgeren til Folkeforbundet er FN.

Kilde: Wikipedia